Pas de biographie disponible.

Compositeur Musique additionelle Librettiste Parolier Metteur en scène Chorégraphe Producteur création Producteur version




Théâtre
0001 - Mother Courage and her Children ()
Musique:
Paroles:
Livret: Bertold Brecht
Production originale:
5 versions mentionnées
Dispo:

Genèse:

Résumé:

Création: 1941// - Schauspielhaus (Zurich) - représ.



Musical
0002 - Dreigroschenoper (Die) (L'Opéra de quat'sous) (1928)
Musique: Kurt Weill
Paroles: Bertold Brecht
Livret: Bertold Brecht
Production originale:
0 version mentionnée
Dispo: Synopsis  Commentaire  Génèse  Liste chansons  

Genèse: The Threepenny Opera was first performed at the Theater am Schiffbauerdamm in Berlin in 1928. Despite an initially poor reception, it became a great success, playing 400 times in the next two years. The performance was a springboard for one of the best known interpreters of Brecht and Weill's work, Lotte Lenya, who was married to Weill. In the United Kingdom, it took some time for the first fully staged performance to be given (9 February 1956, under Berthold Goldschmidt). There was a concert version in 1933, and there was a semi-staged performance on 28 July 1938. In between, on 8 February 1935 Edward Clark conducted the first British broadcast of the work. It received scathing reviews from Ernest Newman and other critics. But the most savage criticism came from Weill himself, who described it privately as "... the worst performance imaginable ... the whole thing was completely misunderstood". But his criticisms seem to have been for the concept of the piece as a Germanised version of The Beggar's Opera, rather than for Clark's conducting of it, of which Weill made no mention. The Threepenny Opera has been translated into 18 languages and performed more than 10,000 times. A French version produced by Gaston Baty and written by Nicole Steinhof and André Mauprey was presented in October of 1930 at the Théâtre Montparnasse. It was rendered as L'Opéra de quat'sous; (quatre sous, or four pennies being the idiomatically equivalent French expression for Threepenny and, by implication, cut-price, cheap). Georg Wilhelm Pabst produced a German film version in 1931 called Die 3-Groschen-Oper, and the French version of his film was again rendered as L'Opéra de quat'sous. It has been translated into English several times. One was published by Marc Blitzstein in the 1950s and first staged under Leonard Bernstein's baton at Brandeis University in 1952. It was later used on Broadway. Other translations include the standard critical edition by Ralph Manheim and John Willett (1976), one by noted Irish playwright and translator Frank McGuinness (1992), and another by Jeremy Sams for a production at London's Donmar Warehouse in 1994. Broadway At least six Broadway and Off-Broadway productions have been mounted in New York. • The first, adapted into English by Gifford Cochran and Jerrold Krimsky and staged by Francesco Von Mendelssohn, featured Robert Chisholm as Macheath. It opened on Broadway at the Empire Theatre, on April 13, 1933, and closed after 12 performances. The brevity of the run has been attributed to the stylistic gap between the Weill-Brecht work and the typical Broadway musical during a busy and vintage period in Broadway history. • In 1956, Lotte Lenya won a Tony Award for her role as Jenny in Blitzstein's somewhat softened version of The Threepenny Opera, which played Off-Broadway at the Theater de Lys in Greenwich Village for a total of 2,707 performances. Blitzstein had translated the work into English; Lenya, Weill's wife since the 1920s, had sung both Jenny and Polly earlier in Germany. The production showed that musicals could be profitable Off-Broadway in a small-scale, small orchestra format. This production is also notable for having Edward Asner (as Mr Peachum), Charlotte Rae as Mrs Peachum, Bea Arthur (as Lucy), Jerry Orbach (as PC Smith, the Street Singer and Mack), John Astin (as Readymoney Matt/Matt of the Mint) and Jerry Stiller (as Crookfinger Jake) as members of the cast during its run. • A nine-month run in 1976 had a new translation by Ralph Manheim and John Willett for the New York Shakespeare Festival at the Vivian Beaumont Theater at Lincoln Center, with Raúl Juliá as Macheath, Blair Brown as Lucy, and Ellen Greene as Jenny. The cast album from this production was re-issued in compact disc in 2009. • A 1989 Broadway production, billed as 3 Penny Opera, translated by Michael Feingold starred Sting as Macheath. Its cast also featured Georgia Brown as Mrs Peachum, Maureen McGovern as Polly, Kim Criswell as Lucy, KT Sullivan as Suky Tawdry and Ethyl Eichelberger as the Street Singer. Sting famously grew a thin moustache for the role, and when it closed after 65 performances he shaved it off onstage with a straight razor. • Liberally adapted by playwright Wallace Shawn, the work was brought back to Broadway[11] by the Roundabout Theatre Company in March 2006 with Alan Cumming playing Macheath, Nellie McKay as Polly, Cyndi Lauper as Jenny, Jim Dale as Mr Peachum, Ana Gasteyer as Mrs Peachum, Carlos Leon as Filch, Adam Alexi-Malle as Jacob and Brian Charles Rooney as a male Lucy. Included in the cast were drag performers. The director was Scott Elliott, the choreographer Aszure Barton, and, while not adored by the critics, the production was nominated for the "Best Musical Revival" Tony award. Jim Dale was also Tony-nominated for Best Supporting Actor. The run ended on June 25, 2006. • The Brooklyn Academy of Music presented a production directed by Robert Wilson and featuring the Berliner Ensemble for only a few performances in October 2011. The play was presented in German with English supertitles using the 1976 translation by John Willett. The cast included Stefan Kurt as Macheath, Stefanie Stappenbeck as Polly and Angela Winkler as Jenny. The Village Voice gave the production a savage review, writing: West End (London) • Empire Theatre, 13 April 1933. • Royal Court Theatre, 9 February 1956. • Prince of Wales Theatre and Piccadilly Theatre, 1972 • Donmar Warehouse, 1994. With a new lyric translation by Jeremy Sams. This version was recorded onto CD with Tom Hollander as Macheath and Sharon Small as Jenny.

Résumé:

Création: 31/8/1928 - Theater am Schiffbauerdamm (Berlin) - représ.



Théâtre
0003 - Resistible rise of Arturo Ui (The) (1958)
Musique:
Paroles:
Livret: Bertold Brecht
Production originale:
3 versions mentionnées
Dispo: Synopsis  Génèse  

Genèse: La première trace d'un intérêt de Brecht pour le thème de Ui est rapportée par Walter Benjamin à propos d'un entretien avec Brecht en 1934. Brecht a écrit la pièce en 1941, lors de son exil en Finlande, en trois semaines seulement. Il a fait quelques modifications mineures ultérieurement. Brecht est arrivé aux États-Unis en juillet 1941 et avait l'intention d'y faire jouer la pièce. Malgré sa prise de contact, en septembre 1941, avec Erwin Piscator et Berthold Viertel, la pièce n'a pas été montée. Erwin Piscator avait fait préparer une traduction américaine de la pièce et a constaté, lors de la lecture de cette version au Dramatic Workshop de New York, une réception plutôt fraiche : « Hoffman Reynolds Hays a entrepris un travail héroïque et a réalisé en 8 jours une traduction du « Ui ». J'ai fait faire une lecture de la traduction ici et je n'ai eu hélas que peu de succès. Voir la copie ci-jointe de la lettre de Louis Schaffer, le directeur du Labor Stage théâtre » (lettre de Erwin Piscator à Bertold Brecht, octobre 1941).

Résumé:

Création: 10/11/1958 - *** Inconnu (***) - représ.